Irish Cups o’ Cream

Irish Cups o' Cream
Irish Cups o' Cream
Smooth, cool, creamy!

Well, these probably aren’t really Irish; we tend to think that they’re more French, but we’ll call them Irish, anyway. We think that most people from Ireland might have at least a wee taste.

We came up with the idea for these as a possible dessert for the upcoming holidays, and, naturally, we had to try them first. We’d surely hate to make them for Thanksgiving or Christmas, and have a dessert we don’t like.

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Savory Goat Cheese and Pumpkin Pie

savory goat cheese and pumpkin pie
savory goat cheese and pumpkin pie
Pie for dinner! Yay!

No, this isn’t for dessert. It’s not that kind of pie. Instead, this pumpkin pie is a main dish. While you might not think of it, pumpkin is nothing but a large squash, and you’ve probably had a whole variety of squashes as part of your meals. So, why not as a pie? After all, wouldn’t it be fun to have pie for dinner?

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Savory Whole-Grain Nuggets

Savory whole-grain nuggets
Savory whole-grain nuggets
It looks like a classic Italian dish, but it has a twist.

Or perhaps we should title this, “How we used some leftover brown rice?” While both titles are accurate, the latter really reflects how this came about. On most Sundays, we cook up a batch of (normally dried) beans and a cup of rice for a simple lunch, which so happens to be one of our favorite meals, and we often have enough left over for another lunch later in the week. This past week, we used canned beans — we were out of dried beans — so we had leftover rice, but no leftover beans. Savory Whole-Grain Nuggets to the rescue.

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Zucchini Shakshuka

zucchini shakshuka
zucchini shakshuka
Odd name (to us), but fast and tasty!

We include zucchini in the title simply because we’ll make this dish to help use some of the plethora of summer squash that we get during the season. But, really, there are only two things you need to remember for making Shakshuka: spicy tomato sauce and eggs. As far as we can tell, everything else can be changed (even the spiciness, of course) to suit what you have on hand and what you like. With that in mind, we’ll show you what we did for a quick and easy lunch (it’ll also work for dinner, or even breakfast).

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Sponge Cake

spong cake
spong cake
A little knife work and some leftover Roasted Balsamic Strawberries and we have a dessert.

When we saw this recipe in My Kitchen Year, by Ruth Reichl, we were intrigued. First, because it was an old recipe, coming from Mary J. Lincoln via the Boston Cooking School magazine. We like old recipes; there’s just something fun about making a cake that your great-grandparents might have had for a celebration. It gives you a tangible connection with the past. The second reason we liked this recipe was its simplicity — only four ingredients. How can you make a cake with just four ingredients? Read on, fellow scratcher.

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Meyer Lemon Semifreddo

lemon semifreddo
lemon semifreddo
Like ice cream, without churning!

Why let all those people with the ice cream machines have all the fun? Full disclosure: we have one and use it quite often. But, it’s entirely possible to make a great ice cream-like treat without an ice cream churn. Simply make semifreddo. In some respects, it might even be better than ice cream, as it’s lighter and more like frozen mousse. Sound good? Let’s scratch out a batch together!

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Mary M. Peter’s Tomato Fricassee (1889)

tomato fricassee and biscuits
tomato fricassee and biscuits
Served over hot biscuits, this made a great light meal!

We don’t know who Mary M. Peter was; however, we found this recipe in a small, but packed, book of historic recipes, and had to try it. It just sounded so intriguing, and, in reading the list of ingredients, we had no idea how it would turn out. The authors of The Historic Kentucky Kitchen, Deirdre A. Scaggs and Andrew W. McGraw, stated that they just fell in love with this recipe. That’s enough to get us to try it.

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