Mandarin Orange, Gorgonzola, and Pecan Salad with a Raspberry-Lime Vinaigrette

Today we are making bread dough, so just a quick recipe. Or maybe more of an idea for one of your salads and a bit of thought process about how this particular salad combination came to fruition.

We knew we wanted a salad to go with dinner, ideally with a bit of sweet, a bit savory, a bit sour, a bit bitter, and a bit salty. Just to hit all the tastebuds, which makes for that more complex interaction of flavors. When we looked in the fridge, we saw mixed lettuce, and some arugula, to form the basis of the salad and provide a hint of bitterness. For the salty and savory, we decided to add the wedge of Gorgonzola that was a few weeks old. Now for the sweet; well, we had just picked up fresh mandarin oranges — it’s the season — so that would be the sweet. The pecans added a bit more sweet and a bit of crunchiness — nice. Continue reading “Mandarin Orange, Gorgonzola, and Pecan Salad with a Raspberry-Lime Vinaigrette”

Worth the trouble?

Bittersweet Chocolate Tart

This is not a subtle dessert. It simply overpowers all other chocolate desserts. By an order of magnitude. Putting this tart up against, say, a chocolate cake, is like putting  Andre the Giant up against a fifth grade wrestler. Or Nadia Comaneci up against first grade tumblers. It is that good. And once you see how to make it, you’ll understand why.

Years ago, we happened across this dessert at one of our favorite restaurants, Simon Pearce at the Mill in Quechee, VT. We would drive up from the Boston area, have lunch, this dessert, and wander around the shops and watch the glassblowing. In the afternoon, we’d drive back home on some of the back roads admiring the beautiful New England scenery. It made for a really pleasant day, especially in the fall.

Then one day we showed up for lunch and the Bittersweet Chocolate Tart was not on the menu. Horrors! We couldn’t believe it! No Bittersweet Chocolate Tart! How would we survive? Panicked, we inquired of the waitstaff, and they said yes it was true, no more Bittersweet Chocolate Tart, it had, indeed, been taken off the menu. But, not all was lost; we explained our devotion to this desert, and, before we left, we were presented with a copy of The Recipe. This one is always capitalized.

Serves: About 12-16 or more

Bittersweet Chocolate Tart

Bittersweet Chocolate Tart

Ingredients

    Crust:
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • Pinch salt
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 6 Tbs sifted cocoa
  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • Filling:
  • 24 ounces bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped
  • 2 cups heavy cream

Abbreviated Instructions

Crust:

In a food processor, combine the sugar and butter. Process until creamy.

Add vanilla, salt, and cocoa. Process until the mixture forms a smooth paste.

Add the flour, and process until just blended.

Turn out the dough. Place it on a sheet of plastic wrap or waxed paper. Shape into an 8-inch disk, wrap, and chill in the refrigerator for an hour.

Roll out the crust into an 11-inch circle, and fit into a 9 1/2 inch tart pan, making strong sides. Chill at least 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Prick the bottom of the crust with a fork, then pop it in the oven for 12-14 minutes, or until the pastry is dry to the touch. Set on a rack to cool.

Filling:

Place the chocolate in a heatproof bowl.

On medium heat, heat the cream in a sauce pan until bubbles form along the edge of the pan.

Pour cream over the chocolate. Let stand for 30 seconds. Stir until melted and smooth.

Pour the chocolate into the tart shell. Smooth it out on top so it looks nice, and refrigerate until it is set, about 3 -5 hours.

http://scratchinit.halversen.com/2012/12/bittersweet-chocolate-tart/

Ingredients:

Crust:

  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • Pinch salt
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 6 Tbs sifted cocoa
  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour

Filling:

  • 24 ounces bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped
  • 2 cups heavy cream

Ingredients discussion:

We think you can see why this dessert crushes all other chocolate desserts. The filling is the star. A pound and a half of chocolate! Two cups of cream! So, naturally, you want the best possible chocolate. We have used Valrhona 73% cacao, and Callebaut 70% cacao. Both expensive, but this is not a cheap dessert, by any means; it is, however, the best.

Procedure:

Crust:

creamed butter and sugar
Process the butter and sugar together until dreamy creamy.

Combine sugar and butter. In a food processor, combine the sugar and butter. Process until creamy; you will have to scrape the sides down with a spatula. Do it, then process some more.

cocoa on the creamed butter
Add the salt, vanilla, and cocoa. It doesn’t look like much right now, but just wait.

Add vanilla, salt, and cocoa. Process until the mixture forms a smooth paste

 

Flour added to the chocolate “paste.” Don’t worry, this is way better than the paste you had in grade school.

Add flour. Add the flour, and process until just blended. Looks good already, huh?

After incorporating the flour, the mixture should look like this. Dump it out onto waxed paper.

Turn out the dough. Place it on a sheet of plastic wrap or waxed paper. Shape into an 8-inch disk, wrap, and chill in the refrigerator for an hour (no, not you, the crust dough).

 

Placing the dough between two sheets of waxed paper helps prevent sticking. At least to the rolling pin. If it sticks to the waxed paper, put it in the fridge for a few minutes.

Roll out the crust into an 11-inch circle, and fit into a 9 1/2 inch tart pan, making strong sides. It has a tendency to slump a bit when baking.

tart crust ready to bake
Tart crust, almost ready to bake. It has to chill for at least 30 minutes first.

Chill at least 30 minutes (you and the crust).

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Baked tart crust. It did sag a bit, didn’t it? Well, don’t we all?

Bake. Prick the bottom of the crust with a fork, then pop it in the oven for 12-14 minutes, or until the pastry is dry to the touch. Smells good, doesn’t it?

Cool. Set it on a rack and let cool.

Filling:

chocolate in a bowl
Broken chocolate in a bowl. We should have made the pieces smaller.

Place the chocolate in a heatproof bowl.

 

cream in a pan
Heat the cream until it bubbles. This time of year, cream should be available in gallon jugs.

Heat cream. On medium heat, heat the cream in a sauce pan until bubbles form along the edge of the pan.

cream over chocolate
We’re really making a ganache, just don’t tell anyone.

Pour cream over the chocolate. Let stand for 30 seconds.

chocolate ganache
The chocolate is all melted. We did have to pop it in the microwave for about 60 seconds to melt the big pieces.

Stir until melted and smooth. Don’t lick the spoon yet, that’s coming up.

Once your tart shell is filled, lick up the rest. It might be a sin to waste chocolate.

Pour the chocolate into the tart shell. Smooth it out on top so it looks nice, and refrigerate until it is set, about 3 -5 hours. In the meantime, lick the spoon and the bowl. We do!

Slice into very narrow slices (a little goes a loooong way, with all that chocolate). Bite into it and be transported directly to chocolate heaven. And you scratched 100 percent of it. Five stars (that’s all we have).

Worth the trouble?

Buttermilk

Let’s do a really simple recipe today. So simple that people have made this for thousands of years: buttermilk. Yep, everyday cultured buttermilk for making buttermilk pancakes, waffles, biscuits, all those good things.

Buttermilk

Ingredients

  • 2 cups milk
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk

Abbreviated Instructions

In a super clean glass container (you could sterilize it, but we just wash and rinse under hot water, then air dry), pour in the 2 cups milk.

Pour in 1/2 cup buttermilk and stir to combine.

Cover and let sit 24 hours.

Refrigerate and use within a week or two.

http://scratchinit.halversen.com/2012/11/buttermilk/

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups milk
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk

Ingredient discussion:

Note that to make buttermilk, you need buttermilk. So, how do you get started? We picked up a quart of cultured buttermilk at Trader Joe’s, oh, probably a year ago. We used most of it, but we reserved some to make our scratched buttermilk. Then, when we run low, we just use some scratched buttermilk to make a new batch. Milk: use milk that you feel comfortable using. We use organic skimmed milk, but it’ll work with 1%, 2%, or whole milk; however, we’re not sure about the ultra pasteurized milk. You’d be on your own.

Procedure:

milk
Just pour in 2 cups milk. Pretty much any kind will do. That’s the advantage of scratchin’; you make the product to fit your diet.

Add the milk. In a super clean glass container (you could sterilize it, but we just wash and rinse under hot water, then air dry), pour in the 2 cups milk. We have a handy measuring cup with a lid, so we can just add milk up to the 2 cup line.

adding buttermilk
Just pour in the buttermilk. Use some from your last scratched batch, or if you’re just starting, use store-bought cultured buttermilk.

Add the buttermilk. Pour in 1/2 cup buttermilk.

mixing milk and buttermilk
Whew. Tough recipe, huh? Two ingredients and a bit of stirring. If you’re worn out, don’t worry, we’re almost finished.

Stir. Stir the milk and buttermilk together.

making buttermilk
Now just let it sit at room temperature for 12-24 hours. It’s scary the first time, but it’ll turn out. People have been doing this for millennia.

Cover and let sit 24 hours. Yep, just place it on the counter for 24 hours. Yeah, we worried the first time we did it, but the buttermilk turned out perfect. Yours will, too.

completed butermilk
Your buttermilk should have thickened nicely. In general, ours turns out thicker than the store brand.

Pop it in the fridge. Use it within a couple of weeks, and don’t forget to make more before you run out. If you’re careful, you can keep the buttermilk going a long, long, time.

Since it is the easiest recipe on the planet, and it makes buttermilk that’s better than the store-bought kind — thicker, no added salt, no carrageenen (seaweed) — it gets five stars.

Worth the trouble?

Saturday Dinner

Hmm. We have a commitment this Sunday afternoon/evening, so once again we have to move our big dinner up a day. But we will provide you with the best chocolate recipe we have in our repertoire: Bittersweet Chocolate Tart. It is a bruiser of a dessert. Once you have it, you’ll remember it for the rest of you life. We do. The rest of the dishes will be a bit more ordinary, to wit:

As of today, a number of things are up in the air — we’ll be using some of our CSA produce — and once they firm up, we’ll be updating this post.

Q: So a number of things changed, why? A: When we baked up the butternut squash for the risotto, it was clear that they would be plenty of food, so we left off the side. We had to change the risotto at the last-minute when we realized that we used up all the sage on Thanksgiving and hadn’t bought more. The salad, we created on spur of the moment. We had some Cuties(tm), and a bit of Gorgonzola left, so those were going in. Then we wanted to play off the citrus, so we thought lime, and the raspberry-lime vinaigrette was born.

 

Q: Timeline? A: Pretty straightforward since we make risotto often. We made the crust for the tart around 1:00; while it was chilling we cubed and baked the butternut squash around 2:00. While the butternut was baking, we rolled out the tart crust, so it could go in the oven after the butternut came out. Around 3:oo we made the tart filling, and popped it in the fridge to set. We put the salad put together and set in the refrigerator around 4:00 along with the measured-out ingredients for the vinaigrette.  Then we started with the Mise en Place for the risotto, grating the Parmesan, heating broth, finely dicing onions, etc., so we could start cooking around 5:00 for a 6:00 dinner. Dinner rolls, of course, we had frozen from baking day, so those are a no-brainer.

 

Q: Anything different for next time? A: Put sage on the grocery list immediately after using the last of it.

From the CSA

Our weekly share.

The fresh-from-the-farm produce this week consisted of:

  • Pickling cucumbers (2)
  • Eight-ball squash (2)
  • Bok Choy (1) but we traded roasted chili peppers for another
  • Tomatoes (4) — three green, but one was beginning to ripen
  • Scarlett turnips with greens (1 bunch)
  • Arugula (1 bunch)
  • Salad mix (1 bag)

The cucumbers are going into super-easy pickles. We used the ripest tomato for last night’s mesquite grilled pizzettas. We just got a recipe for making zucchini relish that we’d like to try, so those eight-ball squashes could have plans. Salad mix and arugula: salads, of course, although we might turn the arugula into pesto. You’ll have to check back during the week to find out.

December 1 update: We cooked up the turnip greens as slow-cooked greens to go along with melted cheese and lettuce sandwiches for lunch yesterday. Also yesterday, we had one-half of the eight-ball squash along with mushrooms and red pepper sautéed in olive oil. One bunch of bok choy went into a quick pasta/greens dish with a sesame-soy sauce and topped with cashews that we had for lunch today. About one-half of the salad mix and arugula have been used in side salads over the last couple of days. That pretty much brings us up to date, for now.

December 4 update: Today we’ll pick up our new batch of CSA produce so we had to update to explain how we used everything from last week (or not). We used the remaining arugula for a small batch of arugula pesto, which we had on sandwiches along with the last of the lettuce. We’ll use the last bit of arugula pesto on grilled pizzettas tomorrow along with the remaining two tomatoes. Today, for lunch we had a frittata using the remaining head of bok choy. That leaves us with a eight-ball squash and two turnips to use sometime next week. We really need to find a way to use large turnips that we like.

Sourdough Pancakes

If, like us, you bake a lot of bread using a natural starter — it’s coming back into vogue these days — you probably wonder what to do with the leftover starter. It’s a shame to throw it away; after all, it’s perfectly good, but there’s really not enough to make more bread, so out it goes. But not anymore. We fretted about the starter issue, and even though it’s only a cup a week going out the door, we really didn’t like the idea of throwing food away.

Then, one fine day, we came across a recipe for sourdough pancakes in Cooking with Italian Grandmothers by Jessica Theroux. Hey, we thought, those Italian grandmothers have been making naturally leavened bread for longer than we’ve been alive. They’re probably onto something, so we tried it. Now, every week, on baking day, we have pancakes for breakfast — sourdough pancakes. A tasty breakfast and no more wasted starter. Of course, we’ve modified the original.

Makes about 20 three-inch cakes, enough for a filling breakfast for two.

Sourdough Pancakes

Sourdough Pancakes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup thick but pourable starter (this is just about the amount we have left)
  • 1 Tbs local honey
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda

Abbreviated Instructions

As you split, feed, and use your starter, save the leftovers.

Add about 1 Tbs of honey to the starter. Stir it in.

Add everything else and stir until everything is combined.

Cover and refrigerate for 24 hours.

Cook as you would pancakes.

http://scratchinit.halversen.com/2012/11/sourdough-pancakes/

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup thick but pourable starter (this is just about the amount we have left)
  • 1 Tbs local honey
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda

Ingredient discussion: Honey: did you know that most supermarket honey really isn’t (try looking up fake honey in supermarkets, you’ll see)? It’s high fructose corn syrup and coloring. So, find a local honey supplier. The one that we found lets us bring in our own jars and sells his honey by the pound. A quart runs us about $10. Buttermilk: it doesn’t really have to be buttermilk, but we always have some in the fridge (we make that about every two weeks), so in it goes. Egg, only free range will do. Everything else: take the quantities listed as approximate; we make the pancakes while we’re splitting and feeding the starter and we never really measure any of these. You can, of course, but as long as you are close….

Procedure:

leftover bread starter
Save your leftover starter. This would normally go to waste, but not anymore.

Save your starter. As you split, feed, and use your starter, save the leftovers. We just scoop the extra into a 4-cup measuring cup. When you’ve accumulated all the leftover starter, move to the next step.

honey in the starter
Honey makes everything a bit sweeter. And it might attract a bear if you’re lucky!

Add honey. Add about 1 Tbs of honey to the starter. Stir it in. If you don’t stir it in now, you’ll end up with honey lumps in the batter. Honey lumps aren’t dangerous, of course, but they can stick to the griddle when you’re making the cakes.

Adding the other ingredients
Just toss all the ingredients in with the honey starter. It’s just pancakes. It’ll be fine.

Add everything else. Add the egg. Add the buttermilk (or milk). Toss in a bit of salt so your pancakes won’t taste like wallpaper paste. Put in the baking soda, and the baking powder. Add the flour.

 

completed sourdough pancake starter
Sourdough pancake starter ready for the fridge. You could have it the same day, but that wouldn’t be the tradition.

And stir. Stir until everything is combined. Don’t worry about pancake instructions that say “Stir until the dry ingredients are moistened.” For leavened pancakes, it won’t matter. Just make sure you have a pancake-batter-like consistency. Add more buttermilk, if need be, or more flour.

Cover and refrigerate. We use those little shower cap thingies that were popular with our grandparents. They were smart. Use something reusable, and don’t waste. Probably like the grandmothers from whom this recipe springs.

Baking day (per tradition):

Remove from the fridge. When you uncover the batter, the top layer may have discolored. That’s oxidation — food rust. It won’t hurt you, so gently stir it back in.

Heat the griddle. On medium heat, let the griddle come up to temperature. You want it hot, so hot that a water drop skitters across the griddle.

Wipe with a bit of grease. No sticking for these pancakes, at least if you grease the griddle a bit.

cooking pancakes
Pancakes griddling on the range. How do you describe cooking pancakes? It’s not frying, nor baking, nor grilling; cooking doesn’t sound right, so it is griddling.

Cook the pancakes. Scoop a heaping tablespoon of batter onto the griddle. And another. And another. Fit a few on (we can get four, each about 3 inches in diameter) and let cook for about 2-3 minutes. Then flip, and cook the same amount of time on the other side.

Serve hot with maple syrup. Real maple, no substitutes allowed. We will let you get away with peach preserves, too. Or raspberry. We normally just stand at the counter, cooking pancakes, eating pancakes, cooking pancakes, eating pancakes, until they’re gone.

We always make these sourdough pancakes with leftover starter, therefore, we give this recipe five stars – count ’em, five!

Worth the trouble?

Broccoli Cauliflower Cheese Pie

With the holiday season upon us, we, like you, get invited to various parties. Most seem to center around food, and they are often potluck-type affairs, which allows us to taste a bunch of new things and maybe get ideas for future dinners. At the very least, we get some really good food, and we try to bring the same. To the party we attended yesterday, we brought a Broccoli Cauliflower Cheese Pie. We like it because it’s pretty easy, travels well, and it’s a bit different from most casseroles. And it’s really tasty, too.

We’ve modified the recipe from the original Moosewood Cookbook by Mollie Katzen. Basically, we changed it to half broccoli and half cauliflower. And please note that all the photos are for a pie that is double this recipe; it was for a potluck.

Broccoli Cauliflower Cheese Pie

Broccoli Cauliflower Cheese Pie

Ingredients

    For the crust
  • Unsalted butter (for greasing the pan)
  • 2 cups raw potato, peeled and grated
  • 1/4 cup onion, grated
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbs flour (omit to make gluten free)
  • Olive oil (for brushing the crust)
  • For the filling
  • 1 Tbs olive oil
  • 1 large onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/2 tsp dried basil
  • 1/2 tsp dried thyme
  • 1/2 medium cauliflower, coarsely chopped
  • 1-2 stalks broccoli, coarsely chopped
  • 1 cup Cheddar cheese, grated
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 cup milk

Abbreviated Instructions

Make the crust

Preheat oven to 400°F.

Butter a shallow 9-inch baking dish.

n a medium mixing bowl, combine the potato, onion, egg, salt, and flour (if using), and mix well.

Use a rubber spatula, or a spoon, or even your hands, to spread the potato mixture evenly in the buttered dish.

Bake for 30 minutes, then brush with olive oil and bake 10 minutes more. Remove from oven and set aside.

Reduce the oven temperature to 350°F.

Make the filling

In a large sauté pan on medium heat, heat the olive oil until it is hot.

Add the onion, garlic, salt, pepper, basil, and thyme. Saute for about 8 minutes or until the onions are translucent.

Add the cauliflower and broccoli, and cook for about 5 minutes more or until the cauliflower and broccoli are tender.

Spread half of the cheese on the potato crust so it’s pretty evenly coated.

Add the broccoli and cauliflower mixture and sprinkle with the remaining cheese.

Whisk together the eggs and milk in a small bowl, and pour over the top.

Bake for 35 minutes, or until the eggs have set, and the top is a nice golden brown.

http://scratchinit.halversen.com/2012/11/broccoli-cauliflower-cheese-pie/

Ingredients:

For the crust:

  • Unsalted butter (for greasing the pan)
  • 2 cups raw potato, peeled and grated
  • 1/4 cup onion, grated
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbs flour (omit to make gluten free)
  • Olive oil (for brushing the crust)

For the filling:

  • 1 Tbs olive oil
  • 1 large onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/2 tsp dried basil
  • 1/2 tsp dried thyme
  • 1/2 medium cauliflower, coarsely chopped
  • 1-2 stalks broccoli, coarsely chopped
  • 1 cup Cheddar cheese, grated
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 cup milk

Ingredient discussion: Peeling potatoes – you really should if they are non-organic. Potatoes are one of the crops on the “dirty dozen” list, indicating that they are heavily contaminated with pesticides. Choose a cheese you like to eat, and, since you’ll be baking this dish, feel free to select for a stronger-flavored cheese. We used an aged raw-milk Cheddar. Eggs: free range all the way, baby.

Procedure:

Make the crust:

Preheat oven to 400°F.

Butter a shallow 9-inch baking dish. Use about 1/2 Tbs, and use butter, not margarine or shortening. While you might not notice in this dish, butter just tastes better.

mixing up the potato crust
Mix, mix, mix. Mix up the potato crust. You want all the shreds of potato to get a bit of egg.

Combine the crust ingredients. In a medium mixing bowl, combine the potato, onion, egg, salt, and flour (if using), and mix well.

potato crust in the pan.
Press the potato mixture into the pan. Make sure to get it into the corners and up the sides a bit.

Line the baking dish with the potato mixture. Use a rubber spatula, or a spoon, or even your hands, to spread the potato mixture evenly in the buttered dish. Play patty-cake and pat it down, but get the soon-to-be-crust to go up the sides, too.

Bake for 30 minutes.

Brush with olive oil. No, this and the previous instruction are not reversed. You do want to bake the crust, then apply some olive oil, then it’s back in the oven.

potato crust cooling on a rack
It’s starting to look good. The edges are a bit crispy, and the crust has set up. Now let it cool.

Bake an additional 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside. We just put it on a cooling rack.

Reduce the oven temperature to 350°F.

Make the filling:

chopped vegetables
Chop up all the veggies. We like to cut the onion into thin quarter rings, that way no one snags a long whole ring while eating.

Prep the filling vegetables: slice the onion, chop the garlic, cut up the cauliflower and broccoli.

Heat the olive oil. In a large sauté pan on medium heat, heat the olive oil until it is hot. You want the onions to sizzle when you drop them in the pan. We often take a slice of onion and just hold it in the oil to see if it is hot enough.

onions sauteing
There is nothing better than the smell of onions sautéing. Except chocolate, but that goes without saying.

Add the onion, garlic, salt, pepper, basil, and thyme. Saute for about 8 minutes or until the onions are translucent.

You are through cooking the filling mixture when the cauliflower and broccoli are tender.

Add the cauliflower and broccoli, and cook for about 5 minutes more or until the cauliflower and broccoli are tender.

Now assemble the pie.

Cheese, glorious cheese. Make sure to spread it around and not just put it in the corner you are planning to eat.

Cover the crust with cheese. Spread half of the cheese on the potato crust so it’s pretty evenly coated. By letting the crust sit, it’s cool enough that the cheese doesn’t immediately melt.

broccoli and cauliflower in the potato crust
Add the filling, spread it around, and tamp it down. Not too much tamping. Don’t worry, you’ll do fine.

Add the broccoli and cauliflower mixture. Just spoon it in, and tamp it down a bit. Ideally, your vegetables should come up to the top edge of the crust.

adding cheese to the pie
More cheese! Everything is better with more cheese. Well, some things, anyway.

Sprinkle with the remaining cheese.

The pie right before baking
Assembled! And we didn’t even need a wrench or a screwdriver. Now bake!

Add the eggs and milk. Whisk together the eggs and milk in a small bowl, and pour over the top. It should come up to the very top of the veggies. If not, no worries.

Bake for 35 minutes, or until the eggs have set, and the top is a nice golden brown.

Bask in the golden brown loveliness of a Broccoli Cauliflower Cheese Pie. Bask, we say!

Take it out and serve. Looks delish, doesn’t it? (It tastes pretty good, too).

Since this recipe is a bit more involved, we’ll have to give it four stars in the “worth it?” rating. The upside is that it is nearly a complete meal or will be once you add a nice salad, and a small light dessert.

Worth the trouble?