Pan-Roasted Purple Potatoes with Rosemary

Pan-Roasted Purple Potatoes with Rosemary
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pan-roasted potatoes with rosemary
Potatoes and rosemary are a perfect combo!

As you saw yesterday, we picked up Purple Majesty potatoes as part of our CSA share. We knew that we’d have to do something pretty special to show off all that color and flavor. Now, it might surprise you that, dear reader, when we want to show off a certain aspect of an ingredient, we tend to do as little as possible to that ingredient; in the case of the purple potatoes, we knew that we’d basically cook them and eat them with just a touch of seasoning. With the elaborate recipes that sometimes show up these days, simple is pretty special.

If it weren’t so hot these days, we would’ve oven-roasted the potatoes; instead, we went with a simple pan roasting. You can do this in the oven, if you wish. It’s all basically the same idea: toss the potatoes in some olive oil, add a bit of seasoning, and cook them until they’re tender.

Pan Roasted Purple Potatoes with Rosemary

Yield: 2 servings

Pan Roasted Purple Potatoes with Rosemary

Ingredients

  • 1 Tbs extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 medium purple potatoes
  • 1 Tbs minced fresh rosemary
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt

Abbreviated Instructions

Heat oil in a medium skillet, preferably cast-iron, over medium heat. Add potatoes and reduce heat to medium low.

Cook potatoes, stirring occasionally, until almost tender, about 20 minutes.

Add rosemary and salt, then stir and cook until potatoes are easily pierced with a fork.

http://scratchinit.halversen.com/2014/07/pan-roasted-purple-potatoes-with-rosemary/

Ingredient discussion:

rosemary
About three sprigs of rosemary is enough; you don’t want to overwhelm the flavor of the potatoes.

Of course, you don’t need purple potatoes for this. Any kind of potato will work just fine. We do recommend that you use fresh rosemary (it’s about three sprigs’ worth), particularly if you have a special variety of potato. Why cook up something special and then skimp on the remainder of the ingredients? Similar story for the oil. Yes, we know the oil will lose its flavor as it cooks. Oh, all right, use a neutral-tasting oil if you don’t have olive oil. Try to use some salt without additional ingredients; sea salt would work well, but we went with kosher for its larger granules.

Procedure in detail:

Royal purple potatoes
Look at those cool purple potatoes! We love ’em.

Wash and slice. For these potatoes, we wanted to show off the cool color, so we washed them well, didn’t peel them (ours are naturally grown — most potatoes have a lot of pesticides applied), and sliced them about 1/4 inch thick.

Cook potatoes. Put a skillet (we prefer cast-iron for making pan-roasted food as nothing sticks) and the oil over medium heat and let it get hot enough so the potato will sizzle when it hits the pan. Add the potatoes, turn the heat down to medium low, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the potatoes are almost completely tender, about 20 minutes.

adding rosemary and salt
Add the rosemary toward the end of cooking. That way the aromatic oils don’t cook away.

Add seasoning. Stir in the rosemary and salt, and continue to cook the potatoes, stirring occasionally, until they’re fork tender, about another 10 minutes.

Serve immediately. While you could keep these warm for a while, either in the oven or over very low heat, we surely can’t resist eating them immediately.

We love potatoes, and this, we think, is probably one of the best ways to show off the potato flavor. The rosemary and salt just seem to bring out more potato-ness without overwhelming the taste buds with a medley of flavors. Plus, with these purple potatoes, it’s a nice way to show them off — we’re not too sure about purple mashed potatoes, for example. If you’re wondering what the purple potatoes taste like, they’re somewhat starchy, like a baking potato with a slight nutty flavor. When you eat it, you can tell it’s a potato, but it seems as though there’s just a bit more flavor there, too. Five stars for taste and simplicity.

Worth the trouble?

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