fried ravioli

Whole Wheat Pasta

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We’ve done basic pasta, and egg-less pasta, and it seems as if you can’t shake a stick at the store without hitting a box of whole grain pasta of some sort or another as people somehow try to eat more whole grains. It’s a good idea; we try to do so, too, but mainly for the flavor and to mix it up a bit. It’s kind of nice to have pasta that’s a little different from time to time, don’t you think?

We had some mushroom risotto left over from our Sunday dinner. Yeah, yeah, we know, that almost never happens. Instead, we almost always just split whatever we make and say dinner’s over. But this time we did have leftovers. So what to do? As you know, risotto is one of those dishes that is best when it’s freshly made — re-warmed it can be glommy. So, we decided to use it as a filling for ravioli. That means we need to make pasta, and, as a change from ordinary pasta, we thought we’d try whole wheat pasta, instead. Why not? It’s only leftovers.

Whole Wheat Pasta

Whole Wheat Pasta

Ingredients

  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • Pinch salt
  • 1 egg
  • 1 Tbs olive oil
  • 1 Tbs dried basil (optional)
  • ~1/2 cup water

Abbreviated Instructions

In a medium-sized bowl, stir together the flour, salt, and, if using, basil.

Make a well in the flour mixture and add the egg and the olive oil. Stir to combine.

Once the egg and oil are mixed in, sprinkle a couple of tablespoons of water on top and stir in. Continue adding small amounts of water and stirring until a ball of dough forms.

Turn the dough out onto the counter or work surface and knead about 10 minutes.

Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate, ideally for at least an hour.

Remove from refrigerator and let the dough come back to room temperature.

Now that your dough is ready, run it through your pasta machine or roll it out with a rolling pin and cut as desired.

http://scratchinit.halversen.com/2013/04/whole-wheat-pasta/

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • Pinch salt
  • 1 egg
  • 1 Tbs olive oil
  • 1 Tbs dried basil (optional)
  • ~1/2 cup water

Ingredient discussion:

white whole wheat flour
We tried white whole wheat flour because that’s what we had on hand.

We happened to have a bag of “white whole wheat flour” on hand. The package said it is milled finer, which, to our minds, might be better for pasta. The egg, like all eggs in our house, is from pastured chickens. The odd ingredient here is the basil. We just thought that we’d try adding a some herbs to the pasta dough to see how it turns out. We’ll let you know.

Procedure:

Mix dry ingredients. In a medium-sized bowl, stir together the flour, salt, and basil.

adding egg and oil.
Add the egg and oil, stir to combine. It will not form a dough, yet.

Add egg and oil. Make a well in the flour mixture and add the egg and the olive oil. Stir to combine.

Add water. Once the egg and oil are mixed in, sprinkle a couple of tablespoons of water on top and stir in. Continue adding small amounts of water and stir until a ball of dough forms.

pasta dough
After adding water bit by bit, you’ll get a rough dough. Start kneading.

Knead. Turn the dough out onto the counter or work surface and knead about 10 minutes. Since this is whole wheat, you’ll have to knead the dough more than with white flour. Persevere — we knead about 600 strokes.

pasta dough
Wrap in plastic to prevent the dough from drying and allow the gluten to develop for an hour or so.

Wrap in plastic. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate, ideally for at least an hour. But you also have to take the dough out to warm about an hour before you roll it out. So keep that in mind, too. You’ll figure something out.

rolled out pasta dough
We were using the pasta dough to make ravioli, so we rolled out long sheets.

Shape. Now that your dough is ready, run it through your pasta machine or roll it out with a rolling pin and cut as desired. You can see more details under the basic pasta dough post.

We fried the ravioli, so it’s not really a fair comparison, but we found this pasta a bit drier, and a bit more crumbly than pasta made with all-purpose flour. It did have more flavor, though, so it’s a trade-off. More flavor, drier texture. We’ll be making it again, if nothing else to see how it boils up. Four stars. Oh, and just so you know, the flavor of the basil wasn’t really noticeable, so don’t bother.

Worth the trouble?

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