Pickled Radish Pods


What do you think?

This week’s produce from the farm is a perfect example of how a CSA differs from buying at a store or even a farmers’ market. At a store or market, you choose what you are going to buy. You have the say over what you are going to get, and how much. With a CSA, that relationship is turned around. The farm selects the produce you’ll get, and bundles it into portions. It takes some getting used to, but we are rewarded with freshly-picked produce, grown in a sustainable way, by people who are treated well. We know this because we visit the farm each year. Try that with your next supermarket visit. So, this week the crew at the farm selected radish pods, most likely because it is difficult getting eight types of produce for hundreds of families right now.

So, what are radish pods, and how can you use them?

Radish pods are nothing more than the seed pods from the radish plant. They are crisp and crunchy, taste pretty much like a radish, and work well in salads or even in stir-frys or curries. Today, we are going to use ours to make radish pod pickles. Don’t worry, it’s fast and easy. Twenty minutes from start to finish, at most.

Makes 1 pint

Pickled Radish Pods

Pickled Radish Pods

Ingredients

  • Radish pods (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • Dill (4 fronds)
  • 1/2 cup white vinegar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 tsp kosher salt

Abbreviated Instructions

Wash and pick the radish pods off of the stems. At the same time, wash the dill fronds.

Measure out the vinegar and water; add the teaspoon of kosher salt.

Over high heat in a small sauce pan, bring the brine to a full boil.

Once boiling, add the pods and dill, bring back to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 3 minutes.

Pour the brine, pods, and dill into a clean seal-able jar.

Place the lid on the jar and cool on the counter for 20 minutes, and place in the refrigerator. The pickled pods should be ready to eat in 3-5 days.

http://scratchinit.halversen.com/2013/04/pickled-radish-pods/

Ingredients:

  • Radish pods (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • Dill (4 fronds)
  • 1/2 cup white vinegar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 tsp kosher salt

Ingredient discussion:

radish pods and dill

With a CSA you never know what you’re going to get — like radish pods and dill. Sounds like the ingredients for pickles.

Use ordinary white distilled vinegar. We just buy a gallon when it’s on sale. We decided to make dill- flavored radish pods because we got dill in our share this week. You could also use ordinary pickling spice, or include a couple of garlic cloves. Yes, you want kosher salt. It doesn’t have iodine, which can make the brine cloudy.

Procedure:

radish pods and dill

Pick off the pods and clean, and wash the dill while you’re at it.

Prepare pods. Wash and pick the radish pods off the stems. At the same time, wash the dill fronds.

pickling brine

Pickling brine is nothing but water and vinegar in equal amounts, along with a bit of salt.

Make brine. Measure out the vinegar and water; add the teaspoon of kosher salt.

boiling brine

Bring the brine to a full boil.

Boil brine. Bring the brine to a full boil over high heat in a small sauce pan.

simmering radish pods and dill

Add the pods and dill, and simmer for about 3 minutes to cook them just slightly.

Simmer pods and dill. Once boiling, add the pods and dill, bring back to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 3 minutes.

filling a jar

A wide mouth funnel can make it a bit easier to fill jars. If you don’t have one, just spoon in the pods and dill.

Jar. Pour the brine, pods, and dill into a clean seal-able jar. We use pint-size canning jars because the glass is tempered and unlikely to break. We suggest that you do the same.

pickled radish pods

A pint of Pickled Pods ready for the fridge.

Cool. Place the lid on the jar and cool on the counter for 20 minutes, then place in the refrigerator. The pickled pods are ready to eat in 3-5 days.

Since these are NOT canned, keep them in the refrigerator and eat within 3-4 weeks.

We’ve just tastes these, and honestly, we’re a bit disappointed. The radish pods have sulfur compounds in them, so they smell a bit like cooked cabbage when you eat them. They aren’t bad, but we probably wouldn’t make them again. Next time, we’ll probably just use the pods raw on salads. Two stars.

Worth the trouble?

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