White Wine Mustard

White Wine Mustard
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We’ve wanted to try our hand at making home-scratched mustard for months. Looking at it in the store, it seems daunting somehow, kind of like some exotic elixir that only certified mustard makers should even attempt. All the varieties of mustard make it seem as though it must involve secret recipes, difficult-to-find ingredients, and long, involved mixing and cooking rituals; basically, mustard- making is beyond the abilities of mere mortals.

Nope! It turns out that the reason there are some many varieties of mustard on the shelf is that it is easy to make, allowing everyone to make a variety. Really — we’ll show you.

We started with a recipe from Edible DIY by Lucy Baker, changed the final quantity, used wine instead of beer, used a blend of mustard seeds, and a different kind of vinegar, but other than that, it’s the same recipe.

Makes 2 cups

White Wine Mustard

White Wine Mustard

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup mustard seeds
  • 1/2-3/4 cup white wine
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/2 cup white wine vinegar
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • Pinch allspice

Abbreviated Instructions

In a non-reactive pan over medium-high heat, bring the wine, allspice, and mustard seeds to a boil. Remove from heat and let soak, for 2 to 3 hours, to absorb most of the liquid.

Put the mustard seeds (remove the allspice berry, if using), any wine, the honey, salt, and vinegar into a blender or food processor, and process until the mustard thickens (it will as the seeds are ground), about 3-5 minutes.

Scrape the mustard into a clean pint-size jar, cover and refrigerate for several weeks to allow the flavors to blend and mellow.

http://scratchinit.halversen.com/2013/02/white-wine-mustard/

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup mustard seeds
  • 1/2-3/4 cup white wine
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/2 cup white wine vinegar
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • Pinch allspice

Ingredient discussion:

mustard seeds
We used a 50-50 mix of yellow and brown mustard seeds to give our mustard that country-style look.

Honey: use local. Wine: use what you’d drink. Mustard seeds: try finding them at an Indian market, or a specialized spice store. We used a mix of yellow and brown. Allspice: we didn’t have any ground, so we fished an allspice berry out of some pickling spice and simmered that with the mustard seed, removing it before grinding.

Procedure:

wine and mustard seeds
Boil the wine with the mustard seeds. Then let ’em soak.

Soak seeds. In a non-reactive pan over medium-high heat, bring the wine, allspice, and mustard seeds to a boil. Remove from heat and let soak for 2 to 3 hours, to absorb most of the liquid.

honey and vinegar
We found it pretty easy to measure the honey and vinegar with a clear measuring cup. Do what works for you.

Measure everything else. Meanwhile, back at the ranch, measure out the honey, the vinegar, and the salt. We just layered them in a clear measuring cup with the hopes that the vinegar would dissolve the honey, making it a bit easier to pour (it didn’t).

making mustard
Getting ready to make mustard: everything is in the food processor.

Process. Put the mustard seeds (remove the allspice berry, if using), any wine, the honey, salt, and vinegar into a blender or food processor, and whirr, whirr, whirr. Whir everything around until the mustard thickens (it will as the seeds are ground), about 3-5 minutes.

mustard
A few minutes later — Presto-chango — mustard!

 

 

mustard
Finished mustard settling in to mellow.

Pack. Scrape the mustard into a clean pint-size jar, cover, and refrigerate for several weeks to allow the flavors to blend and mellow.

Enjoy your own scratched mustard. Make this a few times, and I’ll bet that you’ll start making you own special mustard varieties. And, I bet they’ll be better than what you could buy at the store. Not bad for 10 minutes’ work.

We can’t rate this one yet, as our mustard is still in the mellowing process.

Update: the mustard turned out very well. It took a few weeks for it to lose the sharp bite that it originally had. Now it’s similar to a Dijon mustard, although you can tell it has less salt than the commercial versions, allowing more of the mustard flavor to come through. Four stars, mainly because next time we will try a beer-based mustard so we can compare.

Worth the trouble?

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